New Beginnings Inspired the Sherwin-Williams 2022 Color of the Year

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It's hard to believe we're already getting close to 2022, but here we are. Paint company Sherwin-Williams is ready to get a jump start on the new year, announcing its 2022 Color of the Year this morning. And, drumroll please ... the result is Evergreen Fog!

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The cool gray-green hue falls somewhere between the bold jewel tones and quiet neutrals of years past. It's quiet and soothing, but not so soft that it fades into the background.

"Evergreen Fog is a sophisticated wash of color for spaces that crave a subtle yet stunning statement shade," Sue Wadden, director of color marketing at Sherwin-Williams, said in a statement. "Evergreen Fog inspires us to begin again and is a great choice for modern interiors and exteriors."

The color belongs to Sherwin-Williams' "Method" palette from its 2022 Colormix Forecast, which was inspired by nature, art deco, and postmodernism. Because Evergreen Fog is on the quieter side of the spectrum, it pairs perfectly with all sorts of accents.

"Create depth and texture with a mix of natural-looking textiles. Add a little gleam with a fusion of metals — champagne gold, warm brass, or inky black," said Wadden.

Neutrals in the Colormix Forecast that complement the color of the year include Accessible Beige, earth tones like Über Umber, and bright hues like Chartreuse, demonstrating the versatility of Evergreen Fog.

So whether you're looking to use it indoors or outdoors, as an accent or on all four walls, in a home with midcentury flair or a classic farmhouse space, you can definitely make Evergreen Fog work for your space! Head to your nearest Sherwin-Williams to pick up a can in person, or order some (including samples) online.

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Stefanie is a New York–based writer and editor. She has served on the editorial staffs of Architectural Digest, ARTnews, and Oyster.com, a TripAdvisor company, before setting out on her own as a freelancer. Her beats include architecture, design, art, travel, science, and history, and her words have appeared in Architectural Digest, Condé Nast Traveler, Popular Science, Mental Floss, Galerie, Jetsetter, and History.com, among others. In another life, she'd be a real estate broker since she loves searching for apartments and homes.