This Luxe Bath Collection Is Like Living in a Frank Lloyd Wright House

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While it might be a smidge difficult to buy and live in a Frank Lloyd Wright–designed home, you can still bring the design legacy of the acclaimed American architect into your own home. Kitchen and bath fittings company Brizo has just launched a collection inspired by Wright.

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"We have been honored to work with the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation as we developed and designed this collection," Judd Lord, senior director of industrial design at Brizo, said in a statement. "Staying true to Frank Lloyd Wright's vision of reinvention was core to our product development, and the Foundation's incredible knowledge and deep reverence for that vision has been invaluable."

The collection includes more than a dozen pieces — from faucets to shower heads to drawer pulls — in six different finishes. The products are inspired by Wright's design principles, such as a connection to nature and simple (horizontal and cantilevered) forms.

"People sometimes make the mistake of thinking Frank Lloyd Wright's legacy is complete," Stuart Graff, president and CEO of the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation, said in a statement. "But really, it's ongoing. It's not just about what he created in his lifetime — it's about all the artists and all the disciplines he inspired and their work going forward."

Of course, a product designed under Wright's name is going to cost you — prices start at $550 for this collection. But, hey, that's far more affordable than a Wright-designed house!

To learn more and shop the collection, visit the collection page here.

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Stefanie is a New York–based writer and editor. She has served on the editorial staffs of Architectural Digest, ARTnews, and Oyster.com, a TripAdvisor company, before setting out on her own as a freelancer. Her beats include architecture, design, art, travel, science, and history, and her words have appeared in Architectural Digest, Condé Nast Traveler, Popular Science, Mental Floss, Galerie, Jetsetter, and History.com, among others. In another life, she'd be a real estate broker since she loves searching for apartments and homes.