Kim and Kanye’s House Proves This Trendy Decor Style Is Here to Stay

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You've probably caught a glimpse or two of Kanye and Kim Kardashian-West's super minimalist home through their Instagram posts, but Architectural Digest has done a deep dive into what's been billed as "the scariest home ever," according to some social media users.

The Kardashian-Wests first saw the house in the suburbs of Los Angeles in 2013, but have only recently finished transforming it into the (admittedly kind of creepy) all-white, monastery-like home, tapping acclaimed Belgian designer Axel Vervoordt to design the space.

While the stark result might be a little jarring to some, it's partially inspired by a very popular Japanese design concept: wabi sabi. Based on Buddhist teachings of impermanence, imperfection, and the state of being incomplete or empty, wabi sabi is more of a world view than it is a visual aesthetic, but it has translated quite strongly into the world of design.

A classical wabi sabi space often features elements like organic materials and textures, neutral or earthy palettes, a focus on asymmetry, and an overall sense of austerity — which is exactly what you'll find in the Kardashian-West home.

But despite their home's severe appearance, the Kardashian-West family says it's quite lively inside. "The kids ride their scooters down the hallways and jump around on top of the low Axel tables, which they use as a kind of stage," Kanye told _Architectural Digest. "_This house may be a case study, but our vision for it was built around our family."


Stefanie is a New York–based writer and editor. She has served on the editorial staffs of Architectural Digest, ARTnews, and Oyster.com, a TripAdvisor company, before setting out on her own as a freelancer. Her beats include architecture, design, art, travel, science, and history, and her words have appeared in Architectural Digest, Condé Nast Traveler, Popular Science, Mental Floss, Galerie, Jetsetter, and History.com, among others. In another life, she'd be a real estate broker since she loves searching for apartments and homes.

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