Move Aside, Linen Sheets: This is the Ultimate Solution for Upgrading Your Sleep Space

air purifier in bedroom
credit: Parallel Mirrors/Stephen Paul for Hunker; Artwork by Meike Legler

Looking at photos of plush bedroom setups might make you want to dive head-first into bed, but the real secret to creating a dream-worthy sleep situation isn't just picking up a few more throw pillows.

According to Joshua Tal, PhD—a sleep psychologist in New York City—it's all about curating the right conditions to support high-quality shut-eye. And though he does suggest investing in a heavy-duty duvet, that sleep-inducing environment goes beyond your bed.

"People often assume that if they are sleeping and do not remember tossing and turning, they are getting good quality sleep," Dr. Tal says. "However, there are qualitative differences between shallow and deep stages of sleep; it is important to set up conditions to optimize your sleep to get those good deep stages."

Step one of sleep optimization starts in the air. Not only does Dr. Tal recommend staples like an air conditioner and the aforementioned duvet to properly regulate the temperature in your bedroom, he also points to studies that suggest properly ventilated air can support higher-quality sleep.

"Cold environments signal the body to begin the sleep cycle," he explains. "[And] studies have shown that if there is not proper ventilation or purification of the air in your bedroom, CO2 levels can build up in your room and prevent you from getting quality sleep."

To help on both fronts, opt for an air purifier like Dyson Pure Hot+Cool. The air filtration system removes 99.97 percent of pollutants as small as 0.3 microns from the air while circulating it throughout the room to maintain a desired temperature. So, if you set it to 67 degrees (the ideal sleep temp, FYI), or prefer to sleep in a warmer environment, the Dyson will keep heating or cooling the air until it reaches that temperature.

Dr. Tal's other suggestions? A white noise or nature sound machine to mask disruptions, glasses or phone apps that shield your eyes from blue light (or a bedside light like the Dyson Lightcycle task light, which regulates blue-light exposure based on time of day), and blackout curtains to block early morning light.

"Light can tell the body's circadian rhythm that it's daytime and time to wake up, even when it is nighttime," Dr. Tal explains. "It is important to block light out of your room if you want to sleep past sunrise." And once you make these adjustments to turn your bedroom into a sleep oasis, there's no chance you're going to want to get out of bed that early.

Bedroom Essentials