Floyd Is Releasing Modular Shelving — Here's What You Should Know

living room with white shelves
credit: Floyd

If you haven't yet been introduced to Detroit-based furniture company Floyd, now's probably the time to get familiar. The direct-to-consumer brand has just opened the official waitlist for its newest product: modular open shelves.

Founded in 2014, Floyd's mission is to reduce America's furniture waste by offering affordable — and beautiful — flat-pack products that are super easy to move between houses. (No Friends-style "PIVOT!" necessary to get your sofa through the door.) Prior to today, the company offered sofas, beds, tables, and lighting, with shelving as the latest item to hit showrooms.

wardrobe-style shelves
credit: Floyd

The shelves are modular, meaning you can mix and match the three height options (Tall, Short, and Wardrobe) to fit your specific needs. And while each has birch supports, the powder-coated steel shelves come in three colors for customization. You can also order add-on shelves to expand the unit whenever you need.

Low Shelf by Floyd
credit: Floyd

But what's our favorite thing about the shelves? It takes practically no time to build them: A single Low Shelf will take about 10 minutes to construct, while the High Shelf can be assembled in approximately 20 minutes. All the tools you need to put your shelves together — including a Velcro system that attaches the units to the wall — are included with the furniture.

living room with white shelves
credit: Floyd

Add yourself to the waitlist for Floyd's new shelves today by registering here. They'll go on sale by the end of July, starting at $425 for the Short Shelf.


Stefanie Waldek

Stefanie Waldek

Stefanie is a New York–based writer and editor. She has served on the editorial staffs of Architectural Digest, ARTnews, and Oyster.com, a TripAdvisor company, before setting out on her own as a freelancer. Her beats include architecture, design, art, travel, science, and history, and her words have appeared in Architectural Digest, Condé Nast Traveler, Popular Science, Mental Floss, Galerie, Jetsetter, and History.com, among others. In another life, she'd be a real estate broker since she loves searching for apartments and homes.