Zinc-topped tables offer one significant benefit to consumers, along with their classic appearance: they are non-porous, meaning they are easy to clean and will not harbor food-borne bacteria. Similar to pewter in color, zinc can be polished to retain its shine or left unpolished to achieve a blue-toned patina for a more rustic look. These striking differences make zinc a versatile material for a tabletop in a variety of different settings and décor styles.

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Zinc is the 23rd most prominently found element on earth.

Step 1

Clean your table regularly with a mixture of mild soap and water. Wiping your table down at the end of the day or after use is often enough to maintain their original appearance and adequate cleanliness.

Step 2

Do not use your table for cutting or chopping under any circumstances. Zinc is softer than many materials, such as stainless steel, marble and granite, typically used for tabletops, and zinc can easily be damaged by vigorous chopping. Use a clean wooden, glass or plastic cutting board instead if you have limited space and need to use the table for food preparation.

Step 3

Avoid putting hot items such as pots and pans or warmed serving dishes directly on the table. Zinc has a melting point of about 300 degrees Fahrenheit, so use hotplates, towels or simply double up your plates before serving if you need to.

Step 4

Apply a layer of zinc-safe wax polish and a clean rag to your table as needed. Polish a zinc-topped table about as much as you would polish solid wood furniture. However, you may need to polish your table more often if you use the table daily, depending on your desired appearance.