How to Make Twin-Size Sheets

If you just can't find the right bed sheets, why not make your own? Twin sheets can be made in about an hour. Make sure to use fabric with a high thread count (300 or more) to prevent piling and wearing. A cotton blend will hold fewer wrinkles than 100 percent cotton.

Twin beds
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Flat Sheet

Step 1

Measure 102 inches of fabric and mark a straight line with the washable fabric marker. Cut along the straight line.

Step 2

Fold and iron a 1/4-inch seam all around the edge of the sheet. On the long sides of the sheet, fold 1/4 inches again and iron. Use pins to hold the folds in place if desired. Using a straight stitch and a 1/8-inch seam, sew along the long edges of the sheet, removing pins as you sew.

Step 3

Fold the bottom of the sheet 1 inch. Iron and pin the fold in place. Using a straight stitch, sew 1/8 inch away from the edge of the first fold. Sew down the ends of the fold.

Step 4

Fold the top of the sheet 4 inches. Iron and pin the fold in place. Using a straight stitch, sew 1/8 inches away from the edge of the first fold. Sew the sides of the fold down.

Step 5

Trim any loose threads. Wash before using to remove any remaining marks from the washable fabric marker.

Fitted Sheet

Step 1

Measure 96 inches of fabric and mark a straight line with the washable fabric marker. Cut along the straight line.

Step 2

Mark and cut out a 9-inch square in each corner of the fabric. Pin the edges of the corners together and sew straight stitch with a 1/8-inch seam allowance in each corner.

Step 3

Tightly stretch and pin elastic along the edges of the sheet on the same side as the corner seams. Stitch over the elastic with a zig-zag stitch, removing pins as the sewing machine comes to them.

Step 4

Roll the elastic up twice to hide the raw edges and elastic. Pin the edges in place. Stitch over the elastic again using a zig-zag stitch.

Step 5

Trim any loose threads, then wash before using to remove any remaining marks from the washable fabric marker.


Amber Webb

Amber Webb started her professional writing career in 2005. She has written for the United Way, the National Forest Service and has worked in corporate communications at several technology companies. She now works as a freelance writer. Webb holds a Bachelor of Arts in communications from Brigham Young University.