How to Hang Pictures on Sloped Ceilings

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Things You'll Need

  • Tape measure or ruler

  • Picture to hang

  • Pencil

  • Keyhole style picture hangers

  • Stud finder (optional)

  • Drill

  • Drill bits

  • Pan head screws

Tip

Use double-sided mounting squares positioned at the corners of the picture frame to give it extra support and staying power.

Spice up your home decor with pictures hung directly onto your sloped ceiling.
Image Credit: Jupiterimages/Comstock/Getty Images

A sloped ceiling provides interesting structure in a room but can be a serious challenge for hanging photographs and art. Use the best tools for the job to take full advantage of your space and display your home accessories directly on your sloped ceiling or wall. Be careful to use the studs in the ceiling when you hang the pictures so they will be as secure as possible.

Step 1

Measure your picture frame to determine the placement for your hanging mechanisms. Use a pencil to mark an "X" at three positions on the frame -- one at each corner, 1 inch in from the outer edge and 1/2 inch down from the top and a third at the bottom, centered across the width and 1/2 inch up from the bottom.

Step 2

Locate the studs in your slanted ceiling with a stud finder, by running it along the ceiling. Measure and mark three spots on your ceiling to coordinate with the three spots on your picture frame; the ones on your ceiling need to be the same distances apart as the hanging spots on your frame. Position the spots on your ceiling on studs wherever possible.

Step 3

Attach a keyhole picture hanger to each spot on the back of your picture frame. Position the hangers so that the larger portion of the keyholes face down.

Step 4

Drill a small hole in each position you marked on the ceiling. Install a pan head screw into each hole.

Step 5

Hang the picture on the ceiling. Line up the larger portion of the keyholes with each screw, then slide downward to lock the screws in the narrow ends of the keyholes.

references

Jessica Cook

Jessica Cook has been writing since high school when she wrote for TeenGrrl.com and GirlZone.com. During college she wrote for her university's e-zine, department newsletter and an education journal. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in English from Ohio Northern University, a Master of Arts in Teaching from Grand Canyon University and an Educational Specialist's degree in curriculum and instruction from Liberty University.