Leaf blowers propel leaves and other lawn debris through the air by creating winds of up to 180 miles per hour. Whether you're using a back-pack engine- driven model or a motor-driven hand-held unit, these suggestions will help you get your leaves moving again when something goes wrong.

...
Repair a Leaf Blower

Step 1

Check the impeller. Much like a propeller blade creates wind around an airplane, the leaf blower airflow is created when an impeller draws air into the unit and pushes it through the blower tube. If the impeller is too loose or cracked, it won't work right and should be repaired.

Step 2

Check and tighten the blower fasteners if your blower is vibrating.

Step 3

Check to make sure the power is on at the outlet if you're using a electric motor-powered device. Also check the power cord to make sure there is no damage. If neither of these seem to be the issue, you may have a faulty switch or motor.

Step 4

On an engine-powered device, make sure the gas tank is not empty; refill if necessary.

Step 5

Check the vacuum tube to make sure it isn't clogged. If it is, shut off the blower, and remove the tube to clear the clog. Also inspect the impeller housing for cracks.

Step 6

To replace the impeller, unscrew the cover and lift it off. Wearing gloves and using a socket wrench, hold it in place as you pull it out. Replace it with another one the same size from an authorized dealer. To repair a cracked impeller housing, clean the area around the crack with brake cleaner. Roughen it with sandpaper, and fill the crack and the 1/2 inch area around it with metal-impregnated epoxy or fiberglass resin. When it dries, sand the housing smooth.