Gerber daisies, also known as Gerbera jamesonii or Gerbera daisies, are ornamental flowering plants native to South Africa. In the United States, Gerber daisies grow best in the warm climates of U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) plant hardiness zones 8 through 11. Gardeners outside of these hardiness zones can successfully grow their Gerber daisies indoors with little effort. These attractive flowering plants are prized for their 4-inch blooms, which can appear in a variety of bright colors including red, orange, yellow, pink and violet.

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A brilliant red Gerber daisy.

Step 1

Purchase healthy-looking Gerber daisies from your local garden center or nursery. Select Gerber daisies that are just beginning to bloom so that you can look forward to colorful blooms for up to six weeks.

Step 2

Plant your Gerber daisies in a pot that is just 1 to 2 inches larger in diameter than the nursery container. Blend equal parts peat moss and perlite to create a well-draining growing medium for your Gerber daisies. Plant the Gerber daisies in the pot at the same level they were planted in their nursery container.

Step 3

Position your potted Gerber daisies in a bright location where they can receive six to eight hours of direct sunlight per day. Provide at least six hours of bright, direct sunlight per day for potted Gerber daisies that are grown indoors.

Step 4

Provide supplemental irrigation, if necessary, to keep the growing medium of outdoor potted Gerber daisies consistently moist while the plant is flowering. Water indoor Gerber daisies as often as necessary to keep the growing medium moist during the flowering stage. Allow the surface of the soil to dry slightly between watering for potted indoor or outdoor Gerber daisies that are not in bloom.

Step 5

Fertilize potted Gerber daisies only when they are actively growing. Apply an application of a balanced, water-soluble fertilizer every two weeks according to the manufacturer's instructions.