How to Install Metal Roof on a Mobile Home

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Things You'll Need

  • Tools

  • Drill

  • Circular saw with metal cutting blade

  • Utility knife

  • Tin snips

  • Tape measure

  • Marking pencil

  • Chalk line

  • Corrugated sheet metal

  • 3-inch white sheet metal screws with neoprene washers

  • 3½-inch deck screws

  • ½-inch fan-fold insulation or insulating board

  • 1-by-4-inch-by-12-feet lumber

  • Foam closure strips

  • 32 feet of metal gable trim

  • Neoprene rubber roof cement

  • Duct tape

Image Credit: red circular saw on white background image by Ivanov from <a href='http://www.fotolia.com'>Fotolia.com</a>

Installing a metal roof on a mobile home can be a do-it-yourself project saving you a lot of money. The most difficult part of the project is removing the old roof and scraping the roof clean of debris. Consider asking friends to help or hire day workers. Once the roof is clean, laying a new roof is not difficult. There is a step by step procedure of laying insulation, furring strips, corrugated metal roofing, foam closure strips and setting the gables. If you can use a saw and a drill, you can build a metal roof on your mobile home.

Step 1

Unfold strips of fan-fold insulation across the length of the roof after it has been scraped and cleaned thoroughly. Cut any excess insulation with a utility knife and duct tape the insulation seams.

Step 2

Lay strips of 1-by-4-inch furring, end to end and 2 feet apart, across the length of the roof. Locate the rafters by feeling around the surface of the roof. Lay chalk lines across the width of the roof, and over the furring strips, to mark the location of the rafters. Use a drill and 3½-inch deck screws to secure the furring strips to the rafters.

Step 3

Measure the width of the roof and add an additional 8 inches for overhang allowance. Use a circular saw to cut the corrugated sheets of metal to the correct size. Position the first sheet of metal flush against the edge of the house, making sure there is 4 inches of overhang on each side. Insert the foam closure strips on each side of the metal sheet. Secure the corrugated metal sheet using a drill and 3½-inch deck screws to attach the metal to the furring strips. Use 3-inch white sheet metal screws with neoprene washers on the ridges of the corrugated metal sheeting.

Step 4

Overlap the corrugated metal sheets in one direction only. One edge of each corrugated sheet has writing on it, the other edge does not. Overlap the edge without writing on the edge of the previously laid sheet that has writing. The overlapping will prevent the roof from leaking. Insert the foam closure strips into each end of every metal sheet. Insert the foam closure strips into the ends. Secure the corrugated metal sheet using a drill and 3½-inch deck screws to attach the metal to the furring strips. Use 3-inch white sheet metal screws with neoprene washers on the ridges in the metal sheeting until the roof is covered with corrugated metal.

Step 5

Remove larger vents such as the furnace vent before laying the corrugated metal in the area. Measure the vent locations, mark the metal sheet and cut vent holes in the corrugated metal roofing. Replace all cracked and damaged rubber boots around the vents. Use neoprene rubber roof cement to caulk around all vents after removing old or broken sealant. Reinstall all vent hardware.

Step 6

To finish the roof, use a drill and 3½-inch deck screws placed every 12 inches, on the top and bottom, to attach the gable trim on each end of the new roof.

Tip

When going to the home improvement store for roofing materials, take your roof measurements and a digital picture of the vent and replacement parts you need.

Warning

Wear protective eye glasses, gloves and a mask when scraping off the old roofing materials, cutting metal sheets and wood.

references & resources

Wendy Adams

Wendy Adams has been a Web designer, content writer and blogger since 1998. Her love for writing began in high school and continued with a life of personal writing, content writing, blogging, commentary and short articles. Her work appears on Demand Studios, Text Broker, Associated Content and on client websites and numerous social network sites.