How to Build Small Propane Torches

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Things You'll Need

  • 7 inch long 3/8” steel pipe

  • Drill

  • 3/8 drill bit

  • Sheet metal

  • Double-cut snips

A propane torch can be created in about a day.

A propane torch can be used for many practical applications. Propane can be used to soften oil paint, thaw out frozen locks, and help secure plumbing connections. If you have a propane tank, you can create your own torch using metal tubing and a drill. A propane torch is the the device a propane tank connects to emit a flame in a small cone. Propane can burn at 800 degrees Fahrenheit. You must exercise extreme caution any time you are using a propane torch or burner.

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Step 1

Drill four 3/8 inch holes near the end of your steel pipe. These holes will be used as exhaust ports for your propane torch.

Step 2

Drill two taping holes at the end of the pipe where you made the exhaust ports. The tapping holes are designed to allow the propane line to enter the torch.

Step 3

Drill a 3/8 inch hole perpendicular to the taping holes. This is where you will insert the set screw when you connect the propane line. The set screws secures the torch to the propane line.

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Step 4

Draw three separate quadrilaterals with their sides touching on the sheet metal. The three connected quadrilaterals will individually be two and a half inches at the top, two and a half inches at the bottom, and three inches lengthwise. The three quadrilaterals should form an arched polygon. This arched polygon will measure seven and a half by nine inches. The arched polygon will end up being the torch's flare. The flare is the device that fits on the end of the torch and gives the flame a cone shaped look.

Step 5

Cut along the edges of the three polygons using the double-cut snips.

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Step 6

Roll up the sheet metal you just cut out to create a cone. The cone should be ½ in wide at the narrow end, and 1 ½ inches at the wide end. Roll the cone by bending the two side of the three connected quadrilaterals inwards.

Step 7

Fit the narrow end of the cone around the steel pipe. Friction will keep the cone secured to the pipe.

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references

T.M. Wit

T.M. Wit was born and raised in Cleveland Ohio. He has advanced studies in mathematics, probability, business and economics. When he's not freelance writing he enjoys golfing, bowling and poker. He has worked in information systems in Asia and the United States.